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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the united nations general assembly. here's that conversation. mr. president, thank you very much for taking time out of a very busy schedule, having just arrived in new york and welcome back to america. >> ( translated ): thank you very much. >> rose: what do you hope to accomplish here? >> ( translated ): first of all, i'd like to salute the viewers through this program in order to thank you for this interview and this opportunity and i'm not new or a stranger to the united states and the united states society. i lived when i was a young student between 1978 and '85 in the united states. these were student days and these were good days and my family was with me. i want the relationship between the two peoples of the united states and egypt to reach the highest levels of communication and love and respect. respect, mutual respect. this is a message that i want to be clear, very clear, for the egyptian people and they know that and they love this and for the american people. i hope that this visit is the beginning of a relationship of mutual respect and the relationship of not intervening in
minister since 204. he is in new york for the united nations general assembly. the conflict in syria is an essential focus. president obama spoke about the issue earlier today. >> in syria, the future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. if there's a cause that cries out for protest in the world today, peaceful protest. in a regime that tortures children and shoots rockets at apartment buildings. we must remain engaged to assure that what began with citizens demanding the rights does not end in the cycle of sectarian violence. together we must stand with those syrians who believe in a different vision, a syria that is united and inclusive where children don't need to fear their own government. and they have a say, sunni's and christians. that's what america stands for, that's what we will stand for sanctions and consequences to those who persecute and support for those who work for the common good. >> rose: they have the resolution to increase the government three times. meanwhile the killing in syria continues. they're up to 30,000 estimated dead. the impasse is
fabius is here. he is france's foreign minister. he is in new york for the united nation general assembly. at 37 he was the youngest prime minister in the nation's history. today, he is faced with numerous foreign policy chnlz, the threat of a nuclear iran, escalating violence in syria are in focus this week. last year, france played a key role rein libya. i am please to have laurent fabius back at this table. welcome back. >> it is the same table, although a different venue. looking at libya and looking at syria, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> ro
execution- style. at the united nations in new york, iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad aimed new attacks at the u.s. in a speech to the general assembly, he talked of a new world order, without what he called the hegemony of arrogance. he also denounced israeli threats of a military strike against iran's nuclear sites. >> ( translated ): testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threat by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. delegation boycotted the speech, citing ahmadinejad's repeated diatribes against israel. later, the new, islamist president of egypt mohammed morsi also took on israel, over the plight of the palestinians. >> ( translated ): it is shameful that the free world would accept that a party in the international community may continue to deny the rights of a nation that looks to inp
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: at the united nations today, president obama condemned violence in the muslim world, and he told world leaders time is running out to resolve differences over iran's nuclear program. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get reaction to the president's speech from margaret warner in new york. >> woodruff: and we assess the administration's foreign policy as mitt romney criticizes the president for the way he's handled overseas crises. >> ifill: then, paul solman looks at why applying for jobs online may just not work. >> woodruff: what's behind the >> i check the email and the job sites hourly. from 7:00 in the morning until midnight. >> woodruff: what's behind the drop in s.a.t. scores? ray suarez looks at the surge in the number of students taking the test, and what it tells us about learning. >> ifill: plus, we talk with journalist bob merry. his new book explores how voters, pollsters, and historians judge presidents. >> you can't be a leader of destiny, a
as ever. >> ifill: as world leaders gather in new york for the annual meeting of the united nations general assembly. margaret warner gives us a preview. >> woodruff: will new genetic findings reshape the treatment of breast cancer? we ask dr. harold varmus, head of the national cancer institute. >> ifill: and ray suarez kicks off american graduate week with a conversation with three now- successful people who know exactly what it's like to want to drop out of high school. >> sometimes we give up on kids too soon. sometimes we want to teach to the test instead of teaching to transform. sometimes that comes from top-down policies. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences. igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out, sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundat
conferences, one the united nations general assembly in which representatives of the nations who are members of the general assembly come here, including heads of state and foreign ministers and others at the clinton global initiative, business and government and ngo s were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was iran and nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: at the united nations, israel's prime minister urged world leaders to draw a clear red line and stop iran's nuclear program. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get two views of benjamin netanyahu's speech in which he warned that tehran could be capable of making an atomic weapon next year. >> brown: then, was the attack on the u.s. mission in libya the work of al qaeda? we take a look. >> woodruff: from our american graduate series, ray suarez reports on growing pains for north dakota schools brought on by the oil boom. >> i always make it very clear to any perspective teachers of what they are really getting themselves into. i tell them this is the new wild west. >> brown: on the "daily download," we examine how the candidates are using video games to push early voting. >> woodruff: and regular pro referees are back on the football field tonight after three weeks of questionable calls by replacements. we talk to npr's mike pesca about the deal struck with th
. this conversation was recorded on friday while he was attending the united nations general assembly. >> by the end of 2013 we will have-- 2014 we lch 352,000 afghan security forces and even more importantly quality wise they will be very capable. some time ago i visited afghanistan myself and i had an opportunity to observe with my own eyes afghan special operation forces in action and i was very impressed by what i saw. so the taliban miscalculate the situation if they think their situation will be better by the end of 2014. they will be faced with a very strong and capable afghan security force. >> rose: we continue by looking at a new project in brooklyn, it's a basketball arena and a development. it brought together interesting people, including mikhail prokhorov and irina prok rovea his sister, bruce ratner the developer and karen brooks hop hopkins. >> i think the barkley center is in keeping with the spirit of brooklyn. >> wh n what way? >> it's like very energetic and you know in the history there were a lot of claims to change urban landscapes just ifill tow and we do remember that the ei
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)